The 7 Best Selling Flexible Solar Panels for You to Save Money and The Planet

The 7 Best Selling Flexible Solar Panels for You to Save Money and The Planet

We know that there’s a huge buzz going on about the environmental benefits of solar energy.

The solar industry is one of the fastest growing industries, and is currently projected to grow to $1.5 trillion by 2028.

Most people would say, “I hate the idea of solar power. It’s expensive. It’s not very reliable. But I would definitely consider going green!”

Are you one of them?

That’s probably because you haven’t looked into flexible solar panels. These solar panels are cheap and are also good for you and the planet. If you don’t believe me, let me show you the truth about flexible solar panels.

What are Flexible Solar Panels and What they’re Good For?

The 7 Best Selling Flexible Solar Panels for You to Save Money and The Planet

Flexible solar panels (also known as “soft panels” or “flexible solar”) can be mounted on just about anything: a wall, a roof, a car, even a window!

These panels are a new generation of solar panel technology that can be installed in virtually any place around the house.

This allows homeowners to use renewable energy, saving money, cutting down on electricity use, and helping protect our environment.

You can find flexible panels on just about every type of building material imaginable including glass, wood, metal, stone, and even asphalt.

But the most common application of these panels is on the exterior of buildings to harness the sun’s energy.

You’ll learn all about these energy-saving solar panels and what they can do for you and your home in today’s video.

Choosing a Flexible Solar Panel for Your Home: The Pros & Cons

The idea behind having a solar panel system is to reduce the amount of electricity you need to power your home, and this will result in a significant savings.

With the average U.S. home costing over $200,000 to heat and cool, what are the pros and cons of solar panels, which is the most cost-effective solution for those interested in reducing the cost of their energy bills?

First, the biggest pro of installing a solar panel system is that it is completely passive and will reduce your overall utility costs in the long term.

For those who are interested in saving money, and who don’t mind the initial investment, solar panels offer an affordable way to start reducing the cost of your home’s energy bill.

Whereas other methods of energy conservation can take time to pay off, solar panels will help you immediately reduce your utility bills.

However, before you make a decision about whether or not to invest in solar panels, there are some things to consider.

First, solar panels aren’t just for the rich and famous. In fact, they are available for purchase at many different price points, from $1,000 to $20,000.

This means that even if you have a limited budget, you can still reap the benefits of installing solar panels.

Solar panels are also available in various sizes and shapes, including:

• Fixed – A fixed system is typically a flat panel that’s permanently mounted on your roof.

• Track-mounted – A track-mounted system is attached to the side of your house, and allows you to move it as needed.

• Pole-mounted – A pole-mounted system is usually a tall, vertical panel that can be installed on top of your existing light poles.

7 Best Selling Flexible Solar Panels

Flexible solar panels are on their way to becoming the next big thing in clean energy.

They are ideal for homeowners who want to power their homes with clean energy, but who don’t want to pay a fortune for a rigid system.

Flexible solar panels are not only a cost-effective way to keep your home running while using clean energy, but they are also a practical solution for homeowners who live in places where the sun doesn’t shine every day of the year. These panels can be put on your roof during the winter, but will remain operational even in a cloudy day.

With a flexible solar panel, you can choose to install your solar panel wherever you need the most electricity – whether it be your patio, your office or your roof. In addition to the flexibility, you get a cheaper solution, too, because you don’t have to attach the panel to the outside of your house.

Now, there are two main types of flexible solar panels: traditional ones, and newer versions that are specifically designed to withstand temperature swings.

Now let’s get to the part where we’ll find the most affordable flexible solar panel that will best suit your needs.

1. Monocrystalline160 watts, 12 volts solar panel from Renogy 

In terms of efficiency and compactness, the Renogy 160-watt 12-volt monocrystalline solar panel is an excellent example. This product does it all perfectly, from the multi-layered laminated sheets to the toughened glass to the weather-proof design. In our Renogy 160-watt 12-volt monocrystalline solar panel review, we’ll cover all of the above and more.

A stronger frame and a mounting stand would have improved the panel’s durability and portability, but it is still an excellent purchase. There is also a more lightweight and compact variant of this device if these are relevant considerations for you. Even though similar products may be found for less money, Renogy’s product has a more solid feel to it.

2. WindyNation 100 Watt Flexible Solar Panel

These panels may be flexed to a maximum of 30 degrees, making it semi-flexible. For RVs, yachts, campers, and tents, this permits the panel to be flush-mounted on curved surfaces like this. 0.1-inch solar panels are ultra-thin.

In all weather situations, this product is suitable for outdoor use as both the panels and junction boxes are entirely waterproof.

Lightweight and nimble, yet powerful, with four pounds of monocrystalline solar cells make up the solar panel’s weight.

The panel is truly lightweight and portable, making it an excellent choice for mobile use.

Extra feature with fasteners that can be attached using the stainless steel grommet mounting holes in each corner, with both adhesive or Velcro can alternatively be used to attach the panel to the wall.

Diodes in the junction box prevent battery draining/discharge at night.

It comes with 12 AWG solar cable leads and pre-attached PV Connectors when you order the solar panel.

3. Topsolar 100W Flexible Solar Panel

These solar panels have a thickness of about 0.1 inches, making them nearly undetectable on the roof of your RV.

Works as an excellent alternative for boats, tear-drop trailers, and any other curved surface, Topsolar Flexible Panels can be bent to a minimum arc radius of 16 inches.

So we decided to investigate this product and this little experimentation found the problem: the output truly relies on the type of controller you’re using.

Though with the right MPPT controller, you doubt you will have any problems going forward.

Not to mention for charging in cloudy situations, a controller device transforms extra power into more amperage for the battery.

4. Renogy 175 Watt Flexible Solar Panel 

It is possible to put this flexible panel on the curving roof of an airstream, which is inconvenient for normal panels.

This product weights 70 percent less than conventional solar panels, making transportation and installation a pleasure, thanks to innovative polymer materials.

Only a tenth of an inch tall, the Renogy 175W Lightweight Panel is practically undetectable when flat. This panel is about 95 percent thinner than its rigid version, making it suitable for a low-profile solar arrangement.

Exceptionally Long-lasting with xtreme wind and snow loads of up to 2400 PA and 5400 Pa were rigorously tested on the 175W panel.

The following are some of the possible applications: Marine, rooftop, RV, boat, and any curved surface are just a few of the places where the Renogy 175 Watt Flexible Monocrystalline Panel finds primary use off-grid.

5. SunPower 110 Watt Flexible Solar Panel

One of the best options for a solar array is SunPower’s flexible solar panels. They’re a good choice for RV and marine solar setups because they’re lightweight, highly resistant to the elements, simple to install, and highly efficient.

Flexible solar panels, like the SunPower 110 watt 4×8 solar panel, may fill in the gaps left by traditional flat right solar panels.

If you have a boat or RV, SunPower’s Maxeon Prime cells will ensure that you’ll never run out of power, no matter where you are or what the weather is like.

Since the flexible cells can be bent to a 30-degree angle, they can be used in places where a standard rigid panel would be too large or bulky.

There are 32 cells in this 110 watt panel, which are arranged on the backing board in a four-by-eight-cell grid. The stainless steel grommets and MC4 connectors on the backing board make installation a breeze.

Additional warranties include a two-year warranty on cell damage, and a five-year warranty on panel output.

Using this panel, you can be confident that it will produce at least 80% of the minimum rated power for the next five years.

6. Flexible Monocrystalline Solar Panel Richsolar 100 Watt ETFE

Featuring IP68 waterproof junction box and IP67 waterproof MC4 connections, topped with Frameless with six metal-reinforced mounting holes, this product can be used on a wide variety of surfaces, including RVs, boats, cabins, tents, cars, trucks, and trailers.

It also offers portability with only 4.3 lbs. when powered by 100 watts (2.2kg)

These panels have a laminate thickness of 0.08 inches, while junction boxes have a laminate thickness of 0.11 inches.

We’re glad to report that the panels the test of winds of up to 2400 Pa and snow loads of five times that amount.

7. SunPower Flexible Monocrystalline 100-watt Panels

I already have two of them on the hardtop of my boat, and I plan to add two more.

Moncrystalline panels are said to produce only a quarter of their rated output in real life, whereas Sunpower cells produce only a third of their rated output.

Yet so far, I’ve done better than that.

My Victron SmartSolar 100/30 MPPT controller is charging a single 12 volt home battery from two panels linked in series (with a jumper to my thruster batteries if I need more capacity).

And there is a free phone app for the Victron controller, which tracks and graphs the output.

In my experience, the best day yield was 880 watts over 14 hours when the boat was anchored.

The maximum P and V were 130 and 42.52 volts, respectively.

A number of forest fires were burning in the Pacific Northwest at the time.

SotTo get an accurate picture of how much solar power I’m using each day, I keep a log of how much power I consume while the boat is running or on shore power.

The result showed was a few amps of charge at 12 volts is possible when the sun rises in the morning (the mppt controller converts the panel voltage to battery voltage).

The greatest output is usually between 5 and 6 hours midday, but you’ll still be getting amps throughout the day. I

n order to protect them from the sun’s rays, I put 50 little rubber cushions positioned above the hardtop between the panels and the radar dome.

I have no intention of stepping foot on them.

The aggregate panel output is halved when a cell is darkened.

So overall, I’m satisfied with these panels. Smooth, easy-to-clean panels with a very tough appearance.

The Takeaways

Flexible solar panels offer a cheap and easy solution to powering your home without the need for roof-mounted systems. These panels are designed to be attached to your roof and be able to follow the movement of your house, which means they move in unison with your home, and do not require any permanent installation.

With a flexible solar panel, you can choose to install your solar panel wherever you need the most electricity – whether it be your patio, your office or your roof.

In addition to the flexibility, you get a cheaper solution, too, because you don’t have to attach the panel to the outside of your house.

But these solar panels are not only a cost-effective way to keep your home running while using clean energy, they are also a practical solution for homeowners who live in places where the sun doesn’t shine every day of the year.

The panels can be put on your roof during the winter, and will remain operational even in a cloudy day.

All of which is a good win in my book.

Joe Siregar

Hi! I'm a mini solar-powered globetrotter. Stressed, blessed, and coffee obsessed.